< Blogs Tagged "Neck Anatomy" - Iron Neck
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    Is it possible you could clear up that unsightly double chin with some neck fat exercises? This is a question anyone who’s self conscious about the way their neck looks has pondered once they’ve discovered that you can actually train your neck. The topic of “spot reduction” which speaks to the ability to target fat loss in one specific area of your body, is highly debated. People fall on both sides of the fence, and are passionate in their respective stances.

    Don't let a weak pencil neck be the reason you lose a fight you've been training for, or worse, be the reason you have to sit out of training for a few months with an injury. Instead, strengthen your neck & protect yourself in combat sports by reading this guide on the importance of neck exercises for boxing. Having a thick neck will decrease your likelihood of experiencing whiplash. This can result in a concussion, not only keeping you on the sidelines for an extended period of time but also increasing your risk of long-term brain damage.

    Neck training is an often underutilized aspect of physical fitness. Make no mistake though - it is just as important, if not more important, as the rest of your training. Particularly in combat & contact sports, training the neck protects you while actively enhancing your athletic abilities - making the benefits two pronged. 

    It starts simply enough—a twinge of neck pain or bit of numbness in your hands or feet, or perhaps in your back. Then you begin to feel weakness in your arms or legs. Suddenly you wake up one morning to find that you have difficulty walking or balancing. Extreme pain sets in, and pretty soon what began as mere discomfort feels like a nightmare. This is what it’s like to live with untreated sciatica or cervical stenosis.

    Our brains are powerful yet delicate, and there are few things that can change your life for the worse like brain damage. While our skulls are strong, they can only do so much when it comes to protecting the sensitive organ within. These days there is growing awareness of the danger posed by concussions, especially for athletes who tend to experience numerous concussions, which can be devastating to the brain.

    Your brain is a complex, delicate organ that is highly susceptible to injury, and few things can radically diminish your quality of life like brain damage. But to combat this threat, it’s important to understand the various types of head and brain trauma that can occur, and to appreciate the different mechanisms that can inflict these varying forms of harm. One major factor is the direction of the injurious force, and research has shown that our brains are most susceptible to damaged caused by rotational rather than linear movement. So, what can you do to prevent brain injury due to rotational forces?
    Over the last decade, researchers and athletic programs have been scrutinizing over how to prevent concussions since recent findings have highlighted concussions’ long-term health consequences. But, as more attention has gone into the consequences, even more attention has also gone into researching potential ways to prevent a concussion. As the research increases, so does the suggestion that neck strength and concussion prevention are interlinked. 
    The days of asking patients to comply with rudimentary neck exercises with uncomfortable Thera Bands are over. Iron Neck allows patients with mild to severe neck pain to safely rehab injury by reducing stiffness and increasing range of motion. Iron Neck integrates into any clinic or patients’ home. 
    Whether you’re doing weightlifting reps or sitting at a desk all day, your neck is put under stress on a daily basis. If you’re considering taking up a neck training routine, it’s important to learn about which muscles are where and how to target them. Your neck is made up of multiple groups of muscles, each with their own chief functions and actions.

    If you have ever had severe neck pain, you know that neck pain can be debilitating. The slightest movement of your head or shoulders is almost impossible. Whiplash injuries are common and very painful, and they can result from several reasons, with the most common being motor vehicle accident-related.

    Between 50 to 85% of adults with neck pain will experience a recurrence of the pain within five years. The leading cause of neck pain remains to be weak back and neck posture, especially when we sit too long on our computers or text on our smartphones.
    Whether you’re a professional athlete or work in an office, neck pain is extremely common. If you’re experiencing daily pain in your neck, it could be a sign of a pinched nerve. A pinched nerve is a nerve or bundle of nerves that is damaged or compressed due to a number of causes - this can lead to numbness, sharp pain and/or a limited range of motion. If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, it may be time to consider neck training.