< Blogs Tagged "Neck Anatomy" - Iron Neck
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    Over the last decade, researchers and athletic programs have been scrutinizing over how to prevent concussions since recent findings have highlighted concussions’ long-term health consequences. But, as more attention has gone into the consequences, even more attention has also gone into researching potential ways to prevent a concussion. As the research increases, so does the suggestion that neck strength and concussion prevention are interlinked. 
    The days of asking patients to comply with rudimentary neck exercises with uncomfortable Thera Bands are over. Iron Neck allows patients with mild to severe neck pain to safely rehab injury by reducing stiffness and increasing range of motion. Iron Neck integrates into any clinic or patients’ home. 
    Whether you’re doing weightlifting reps or sitting at a desk all day, your neck is put under stress on a daily basis. If you’re considering taking up a neck training routine, it’s important to learn about which muscles are where and how to target them. Your neck is made up of multiple groups of muscles, each with their own chief functions and actions.

    If you have ever had severe neck pain, you know that neck pain can be debilitating. The slightest movement of your head or shoulders is almost impossible. Whiplash injuries are common and very painful, and they can result from several reasons, with the most common being motor vehicle accident-related.

    Between 50 to 85% of adults with neck pain will experience a recurrence of the pain within five years. The leading cause of neck pain remains to be weak back and neck posture, especially when we sit too long on our computers or text on our smartphones.
    Whether you’re a professional athlete or work in an office, neck pain is extremely common. If you’re experiencing daily pain in your neck, it could be a sign of a pinched nerve. A pinched nerve is a nerve or bundle of nerves that is damaged or compressed due to a number of causes - this can lead to numbness, sharp pain and/or a limited range of motion. If you’re experiencing any of these symptoms, it may be time to consider neck training.

    Doctors, public health agencies, and health insurance companies all over the world use alphanumeric codes called ICD-10 for diagnosis representation, such as neck pain ICD-10, backache ICD-10, etc. Each disease, injury, disorder, symptom, and infection has a unique ICD-10 code. ICD-10 codes are used for tracking epidemics to the processing of insurance claims and for the compilation of global statistics on mortality.

    The head and neck muscles have many crucial tasks to perform, including the movement of the neck and head, speech, chewing and swallowing, eye movement and facial expressions. All these tasks need actions that are full of force and strength.

    Having a thick neck isn’t just for looks - pro athletes, bodybuilders and everyday gym-goers alike can benefit from thick neck muscles. Adding neck exercises to your daily workout can yield life-changing results.