< Blogs Tagged "Injury Rehab" - Iron Neck
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    Exercise should be an essential part of your health and wellness routine - but do you really need to do exercises to strengthen neck muscles? The short answer is yes - you should be doing neck strengthening exercises, particularly if you are suffering from neck pain or have recently undergone surgery.

    If you're suffering from golf-related neck pain, it can prevent you from fully enjoying something you love.

    Whether your pain is persistent throughout the round or you feel it later that night when you get home, you'll not be able to really play your best or have as much fun. Is this pain preventable, or is a sore neck or upper back just an inevitability from swinging the golf club? We're here to tell you that you can in fact enjoy one of your favorite pastimes without stressing about injuring yourself or feeling sore.

    Whether it's from a nasty wipeout or the result of overuse from paddling, surfers' necks are as painful as it is debilitating. An unfortunate reality for anyone who loves this sport is that it can really take a toll on your joints and soft tissue - this means you're going to have to constantly be at risk of conditions like surfers' necks.

    Neck pain from cycling is a risk you sign up for every time you hop on your bike. Even with a perfect bike fit, the anatomy of your spine while riding is unnatural - and it puts the neck muscles under a ton of stress. This pain and tension are further exacerbated when you have a weak neck. which, to be honest, most people do.

    While the NFL and NHL made front page news for their heightened awareness of concussions, soccer player Brittni Souder looked for anyone who could understand her textbook symptoms of repetitive brain trauma.

    Learning how to get rid of tech neck is becoming a bigger and bigger issue, so today, we are going to help you understand how to manage the pain and re-establish the good posture you used to have. Whether you spend all day sitting at a desk in an office staring at your desktop monitor, or you always have your phone shoved in your face - one thing is true.

    Nico Barraza tore all the ligaments of his right shoulder and hand, and suffered a TBI, when he went over the handlebars of his bike. The former NCAA baseball player, pro ultrarunner and cyclist is bringing the Iron Neck in to restore his neck and shoulders to full function.
    Injuries to Patrick Mahomes and Lamar Jackson draw attention to the neck’s involvement as they enter concussion protocol.
    Three million people every year have to work through a rotator cuff injury. This year, strength & conditioning coach Joe DeFranco is one of them.

    It starts simply enough—a twinge of neck pain or bit of numbness in your hands or feet, or perhaps in your back. Then you begin to feel weakness in your arms or legs. Suddenly you wake up one morning to find that you have difficulty walking or balancing. Extreme pain sets in, and pretty soon what began as mere discomfort feels like a nightmare. This is what it’s like to live with untreated sciatica or cervical stenosis.

    Our brains are powerful yet delicate, and there are few things that can change your life for the worse like brain damage. While our skulls are strong, they can only do so much when it comes to protecting the sensitive organ within. These days there is growing awareness of the danger posed by concussions, especially for athletes who tend to experience numerous concussions, which can be devastating to the brain.

    Your brain is a complex, delicate organ that is highly susceptible to injury, and few things can radically diminish your quality of life like brain damage. But to combat this threat, it’s important to understand the various types of head and brain trauma that can occur, and to appreciate the different mechanisms that can inflict these varying forms of harm. One major factor is the direction of the injurious force, and research has shown that our brains are most susceptible to damaged caused by rotational rather than linear movement. So, what can you do to prevent brain injury due to rotational forces?